If Robots Will Run the World, What Should Students Learn? – from Edudemic

As automation and artificial intelligence become more and more of a reality in daily life, what are the things that our students must learn? Katrina Schwartz addresses this question on the Edudemic blog…

If Robots Will Run the World, What Should Students Learn? – Edudemic

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Student Collaboration on an iPad

Collaboration is a buzzword in our school these days. With the introduction of iPads to our classes, the challenge is to find ways for students to collaborate using the iPads. Greg Kulowiec from EdTechTeacher has posted an excellent video that highlights six different ways you can have students work together on the iPad. He highlights several apps, including some paid apps that we do not have on our iPads, but take a few minutes to check out what he does with the ones we do use – particularly Notability, Google Drive, and iMovie!

You can also read the full blog post at the EdTechTeacher site.

The PLN, part 2: Twitter for Teachers

This post is the second in a series about Personal Learning Networks. To read part one, click here.

What is it?

twitter-logoAccording to their “About” page, Twitter is, “a real-time information network that connects you to the latest stories, ideas, opinions and news about what you find interesting.” Twitter is a social networking site that can provide different types of experiences depending on what you’re looking for. After you create an account, you select people to follow. As you add people to the list of who you follow, their posts (aka “tweets”) appear in your timeline.

The utility of this all depends on who you follow. Unlike Facebook, you can add people who you do not know. This could include celebrities, news organizations, or just people who post interesting things. It really is up to you to decide what Twitter looks like.

For more info on getting started with Twitter, click here.

Why should I be on Twitter?

The great thing about using Twitter as an educator is that it can be a sort of Reader’s Digest for educational news. We all know every teacher’s #1 excuse to not try something is “I don’t have time.” Once you’ve set it up, it takes very little time. Check here or there, whenever is convenient, and follow up on links or posts that interest you.

Another benefit of Twitter is that you can start a conversation with someone who you may not have the opportunity to meet in real life. I was recently at a conference and tweeted about something a presenter said. He replied, and we had a back and forth dialogue – all while I was waiting for my flight at the airport a few hours later! If you use common courtesy, most people who tweet are happy to engage you.

Who should I follow?

The good news is that there are many great accounts that you can follow that will give you great ideas and resources for teaching. These range from individual educators to organizations. There are tons of lists out on the internet, but here are a few that I follow:

  • Patrick Larkin (@patrickmlarkin) – Assistant Superintendant of Burlington (MA) schools. 
  • Justin Reich (@bjfr) – Blogger at EdTechTeacher and EdTechResearcher
  • Gregory Kulowiec (@gregkulowiec) – Blogger at EdTechTeacher and former History teacher
  • Dan Meyer (@ddmeyer) – Math educator & blogger
  • TCEA (@tcea) – Texas Computer Education Association
  • Bill Gates (@billgates) – Yes, its that Bill Gates, and education is one of the focal points for his foundation
  • Evernote Schools (@evernoteschools) – All about using Evernote in the classroom
  • Michael Fisher (@fisher1000) – Blogger at digigogy.com
  • Barrett Mosbacker – (@bmosbacker) – Superintendant at Briarwood Christian School
  • NASA (@NASA) – you know, the space people
  • David McVicker (@DavidMcVicker) – This guy I know

Should I tweet?

This is really up to you. You may think that you don’t have anything to say, or that no one will care what you do say. But once you start you may be surprised with how many people want to interact with you, or just who finds what you have to say interesting. With that said, it is perfectly acceptable to follow people and read their tweets without ever posting anything yourself.

As a teacher, you should also always consider your audience before you post anything to Twitter. Remember, anyone can read what you post, so make sure its never something you might later regret!

So, do you tweet? Who do you follow? Let us know in the comments!

The Personal Learning Network – Practice What You Preach

“A student is not above his teacher, but everyone who is fully trained will be like his teacher” – Luke 6:40

This, for a teacher, should be one of the most sobering passages in scripture. The idea that my students will be like me when fully trained gives me a renewed focus to “practice what I preach.” In other words, am I an example of what I want my students to be?

It is easy to gloss over this idea with a simple “yes” and move on. If my objective is for my students to have knowledge of a subject then I can affirm that I do know my subject. However, if my objective is more than just knowledge, but also includes actions and dispositions, then the scene is a bit more cloudy.

To answer this question, we must first be clear on exactly what we want our students to be like. Again, the question is not “what should they know,” but rather, “what should they do.” Lately we’ve spent a great deal of time discussing the ideas around the “4 C’s.” Creativity, communication, critical thinking, and collaboration are the skills we say are necessary for our students to bear influence in the world that they will inherit. We could probably add a few things to that list, but I think it is certainly a good starting point.

So then, in light of the wisdom of Luke 6:40, what is the example that you are setting for your students? I would ask if you “model” the 4 C’s, but I don’t think that word is strong enough. To really do this, we must truly embody the 4 C’s, not just model them. Its not enough for us to talk about these things in class, they must be part of who we are! I think of it as the old idea of being a “lifelong learner,” re-imagined for the 21st century.

This is a tall order for many. Our lives are filled with so many things, who has time to invest in remaking ourselves into a 4 C’s teacher? It seems such a daunting task, but there are things that we can do to lower the barrier to entry and get ourselves moving in that direction.

To that end, I want to spend a few posts expanding on the idea of a “Personal Learning Network,” or PLN. Your PLN is a network of people around you that you can interact with and learn from. They may be people you know or (thanks to the magic of the internet) people who you may never meet. It is a sort of etherial thing that can bring real growth in the way that you think about your classroom and your students. It is a place for two-way interaction through conversations, comments, and even tweets! And, perhaps most importantly, it is something that you can initiate with surprisingly little effort.

So, I’m going to spend the next several weeks developing this idea a little more fully. In the mean-time, here are a few links to sites that expand on the idea of PLN’s – mostly without the Biblical guilt trip. 🙂

Personal Learning Networks for Educators: 10 Tips – Mark Wagner, Getting Smart

5 Things You Can Do to Begin Developing Your Personal Learning Network – Lisa Nielsen, The Innovative Educator

PLN: Your Personal Learning Network Made Easy – Kate Klingensmith, Once A Teacher…