5 Tips for Better Managing iPad Memory – from TeachThought

iPad_storage

Like many others, you may be experiencing the squeeze of the 16GB storage capacity of your iPad. Here’s an article from TeachThought.com with some good tips about how to manage the limited resource that is your iPad’s memory.

5 Tips for Better Managing iPad Memory” – from TeachThought.com

Is Your Mac Slow?

One of the most common tech support questions I get from teachers is asking “Why is my Mac so slow?” (Or some variation of that theme). There are (literally) hundreds of reasons why this could be the case. Some of them are simply due to the physical hardware of your computer showing its age. But many more have to do with the way that you’re using the computer. The good news is, these are easy to fix! Below are a few of the most common problem areas and how to address them.

1. Too Many Items On The Desktop

clutter

Too many icons!

Does your desktop look like this? If so, you’ve got too many files on the desktop. Mac OS (the operating system on your Mac) is very graphical and has lots of slick features. One of those is how it shows a preview of the file as the icon on your desktop (or in a Finder window). The downside of this is that when you have lots of files on the desktop, you are devoting a lot of your system’s resources to generating and maintaining those little preview icons. If you have a super-cluttered desktop, simply moving most of those files into a folder could give you a very noticeable improvement in performance! Check out this Lifehacker article for more info – and a cool utility that will help you automate this process.

2. Not Enough Free Disk Space

Look for this if you're using a white MacBook

Look for this if you’re using a white MacBook

Do you have every photo you’ve ever taken saved on your hard drive? Have you never once emptied your trash or downloads folder? Do you have local copies of every cat video ever posted to YouTube? Then chances are your hard drive is close to being full. The method for determining this depends on your computer. If you have a white MacBook, just open a new finder window. It will tell you the amount of free space at the bottom. If you have a silver MacBook, click the Apple logo in the top left corner of your screen and select “About This Mac.” Then click the button that says “More Information.” This will open a window that tells you all about the computer. Click the tab at the top that says “Storage” and you will see a nice visual of you hard drive usage – similar to the one you see on an iPad or iPhone.

Look for this if you have a silver MacBook

Look for this if you have a silver MacBook

The general rule of thumb is that you need to have at least 10% of your hard drive free at all times. Less than that and you will notice your computer slowing down. If you are in the danger zone, try cleaning out the downloads folder or the trash. If that’s not enough, think about archiving some of those pictures and videos to an external drive or cloud storage.

3. Too Many Applications Running

This is a common problem for folks who are used to working on a Windows computer. Unlike Windows, when you click that little red ball in the corner of a Mac window it does not shut down the application – it just closes that window.

There are 8 applications running here. Can you tell what they are?

There are 8 applications running here. Can you tell what they are?

To actually close the program, you can either click the name of the program in the menu and select “Quit xxxx” from the list, or press command+Q. You can tell what programs are running by looking for  a little white dot below the program’s icon in your dock. (Side note – you cannot quit Finder. It will always be running)

4. Reboot Once In A While

One of the great things about using a Mac is that you don’t have to shut down the computer all the time. Most of the time I leave my Mac running and just close the lid when I’m done. When I open it later its ready to go right where I left off! The disadvantage of this convenience is that we may often go very long periods of time without rebooting the system. Often, something as simple as a reboot will help “clear the cobwebs” and get things running more smoothly. I generally try to reboot my computer about once a week, just to reset everything.

Like I said before, there are lots of reasons why your Mac may be running slow, so I may not have addressed your issue here. But, these are simple things that every user should be able to do – and you don’t even have to call the helpdesk! If, however, these fixes don’t work for you, don’t hesitate to give them a call so that they can try to follow up with more advanced solutions.

Student Collaboration on an iPad

Collaboration is a buzzword in our school these days. With the introduction of iPads to our classes, the challenge is to find ways for students to collaborate using the iPads. Greg Kulowiec from EdTechTeacher has posted an excellent video that highlights six different ways you can have students work together on the iPad. He highlights several apps, including some paid apps that we do not have on our iPads, but take a few minutes to check out what he does with the ones we do use – particularly Notability, Google Drive, and iMovie!

You can also read the full blog post at the EdTechTeacher site.

Another Great Update for the Google Drive App

There was a big update for the Google Drive app for iOS today. The last update gave us the ability to create and edit word processing documents in the app, manage sharing, and upload pictures and video. This time we got:

  • Create and edit spreadsheets within the app (including realtime collaboration on shared spreadsheets)
  • Upload any filetype from other apps using “Open in…”
  • Manage file uploads

These are all great improvements, but the biggest change in my opinion is the “Open in…” feature. I tried it out and found that I could create a document in Pages and then upload that document in .pages format to my Google Drive. Once there, I can share that document with another user, who can then download and view the work in Pages on his iPad or Mac! I was also able to upload a large Keynote file in the .key format.

The upshot of all this is that now we have a way to share all sorts of filetypes without resorting to email (and the limitations that brings). For example, I can have a student create a great Keynote presentation and then turn it in via Google Drive without worrying that the file is too big to attach to an email.

Google has really improved their Drive app in the last few months to make it an excellent option for use on the iOS platform. What features would you like to see them add next? Let us know in the comments!

Turn In Video Assignments with Google Drive for iOS

One of the more challenging tasks for teachers and students using iPads has been the issue of how students can turn in video assignments to a teacher. The initial solution that we offered was to have the student upload his finished work to YouTube so that the teacher could view it there. However, this solution is not without problems – most notably privacy concerns and the requirement that students be at least 13 years old to create a YouTube account.

A New Way to Share

With the publishing of the Google Drive app for iOS, we now have a very simple and powerful way for students to turn in video assignments that eliminates the age and privacy concerns mentioned above. The basic workflow with this method is:

  1. Create video in iMovie (or another app)
  2. Export finalized video to the Camera Roll
  3. Use the Google Drive app to upload the video to the student’s drive
  4. Share the video with the teacher

The Details

The first step in this process is to create the video. This can be done in iMovie or any other video tool on the iPad. Once the project is complete, send it to the Cameral Roll. In iMovie this is done by tapping the share icon and then selecting Camera Roll. The exact location of the share button may vary in other apps, but the basic process should be the same. Next select the export size – be careful that you don’t make your video so large that you run out of storage!

Once the video has been added to the Camera Roll, the next step is to open the Google Drive app. I am assuming here that you’ve already installed the app and have entered your account credentials. Once the app is open, tap the “+” button at the top of the screen. You will see several options to add items to your drive, with the third being “Upload Photo or Video.”

When you tap this option, you will be prompted to select a photo or video. Tap on the video that you just created and you will see it begin to upload. This may take a while depending on the size of the file, but it will continue even after the device goes to sleep.
After the upload is completed you will see your video in the list of files. Tap the arrow icon to the right of the file name to open the Details panel, which includes options for sharing. Tap the plus icon in the “Who has access” pane and type the full email address of the person you want to share with. If needed, you can even share with several people. Tap the “Add” button and the process is complete!

Final Thoughts

As you can see, this is a great method for sharing video without running into some of the headaches associated with using YouTube. It keeps your video private and allows you specific control over who can view your file. It also avoids problems due to file size limits in email and age limits on YouTube accounts.

So what do you think? Any suggestions to improve the process? Is there a problem we’re missing here? Let us know in the comments section!

Google Drive app for iOS gets a big update!

If you use Google Docs then you know it is an outstanding platform for managing your work in the cloud, and gives you some great collaboration tools. You also know that it is painfully limited on iPads and other mobile devices. Back in June, Google released a Google Drive app for iOS, but it did not provide much functionality over what was already available through a mobile browser (which was pretty much none).

Well today Google released a significant update to the Drive app. Among the new features are the ability to store files locally for offline viewing, the ability to access presentations, the ability to edit documents, and the ability to see and make real-time edits in shared documents. Yes, you read that correctly, you can now enjoy the same real-time collaboration on your iPad that was previously only available on a computer!

Because this update came out only a few hours ago, I’m still working through the finer points of what the app can do. But I have tested the real-time editing, and it does work. This is a huge leap forward for Google, and brings some real usability to Google Drive (aka Docs) in our classrooms… particularly when you consider the fact that students can link their Google Docs account to their Schoology account…

There’s more to come from this, but you can check it out for yourself at Google’s website or by watching the video they’ve put on YouTube today.

UPDATE – It seems that right now you can only create documents (not spreadsheets or presentations) in the app, but you can edit files of those types that originated in the desktop platform…

Remind101

Remind101 is a great service that allows teachers, coaches, or anyone who works with students to have a means for sending text messages without the dangers that come with having your students’ or parents’ phone numbers (or them having yours)! As an added bonus, the service now works as an app in Schoology! To find out more, visit the Remind101 website or watch this video: