Using the Report Manager in Renweb

I’ve been asked by several folks recently to either generate lists or reports of students or to show others how to do so. This brief tutorial video will walk you through the steps of using the Report Manager in Renweb so that you can get whatever information you may need.

If you’re looking for a particular report, these links will take you straight to that portion of the video:

Class Roster

Class Roster Data Entry

Student List by Grade Level

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The PLN, part 2: Twitter for Teachers

This post is the second in a series about Personal Learning Networks. To read part one, click here.

What is it?

twitter-logoAccording to their “About” page, Twitter is, “a real-time information network that connects you to the latest stories, ideas, opinions and news about what you find interesting.” Twitter is a social networking site that can provide different types of experiences depending on what you’re looking for. After you create an account, you select people to follow. As you add people to the list of who you follow, their posts (aka “tweets”) appear in your timeline.

The utility of this all depends on who you follow. Unlike Facebook, you can add people who you do not know. This could include celebrities, news organizations, or just people who post interesting things. It really is up to you to decide what Twitter looks like.

For more info on getting started with Twitter, click here.

Why should I be on Twitter?

The great thing about using Twitter as an educator is that it can be a sort of Reader’s Digest for educational news. We all know every teacher’s #1 excuse to not try something is “I don’t have time.” Once you’ve set it up, it takes very little time. Check here or there, whenever is convenient, and follow up on links or posts that interest you.

Another benefit of Twitter is that you can start a conversation with someone who you may not have the opportunity to meet in real life. I was recently at a conference and tweeted about something a presenter said. He replied, and we had a back and forth dialogue – all while I was waiting for my flight at the airport a few hours later! If you use common courtesy, most people who tweet are happy to engage you.

Who should I follow?

The good news is that there are many great accounts that you can follow that will give you great ideas and resources for teaching. These range from individual educators to organizations. There are tons of lists out on the internet, but here are a few that I follow:

  • Patrick Larkin (@patrickmlarkin) – Assistant Superintendant of Burlington (MA) schools. 
  • Justin Reich (@bjfr) – Blogger at EdTechTeacher and EdTechResearcher
  • Gregory Kulowiec (@gregkulowiec) – Blogger at EdTechTeacher and former History teacher
  • Dan Meyer (@ddmeyer) – Math educator & blogger
  • TCEA (@tcea) – Texas Computer Education Association
  • Bill Gates (@billgates) – Yes, its that Bill Gates, and education is one of the focal points for his foundation
  • Evernote Schools (@evernoteschools) – All about using Evernote in the classroom
  • Michael Fisher (@fisher1000) – Blogger at digigogy.com
  • Barrett Mosbacker – (@bmosbacker) – Superintendant at Briarwood Christian School
  • NASA (@NASA) – you know, the space people
  • David McVicker (@DavidMcVicker) – This guy I know

Should I tweet?

This is really up to you. You may think that you don’t have anything to say, or that no one will care what you do say. But once you start you may be surprised with how many people want to interact with you, or just who finds what you have to say interesting. With that said, it is perfectly acceptable to follow people and read their tweets without ever posting anything yourself.

As a teacher, you should also always consider your audience before you post anything to Twitter. Remember, anyone can read what you post, so make sure its never something you might later regret!

So, do you tweet? Who do you follow? Let us know in the comments!

Another Great Update for the Google Drive App

There was a big update for the Google Drive app for iOS today. The last update gave us the ability to create and edit word processing documents in the app, manage sharing, and upload pictures and video. This time we got:

  • Create and edit spreadsheets within the app (including realtime collaboration on shared spreadsheets)
  • Upload any filetype from other apps using “Open in…”
  • Manage file uploads

These are all great improvements, but the biggest change in my opinion is the “Open in…” feature. I tried it out and found that I could create a document in Pages and then upload that document in .pages format to my Google Drive. Once there, I can share that document with another user, who can then download and view the work in Pages on his iPad or Mac! I was also able to upload a large Keynote file in the .key format.

The upshot of all this is that now we have a way to share all sorts of filetypes without resorting to email (and the limitations that brings). For example, I can have a student create a great Keynote presentation and then turn it in via Google Drive without worrying that the file is too big to attach to an email.

Google has really improved their Drive app in the last few months to make it an excellent option for use on the iOS platform. What features would you like to see them add next? Let us know in the comments!

Turn In Video Assignments with Google Drive for iOS

One of the more challenging tasks for teachers and students using iPads has been the issue of how students can turn in video assignments to a teacher. The initial solution that we offered was to have the student upload his finished work to YouTube so that the teacher could view it there. However, this solution is not without problems – most notably privacy concerns and the requirement that students be at least 13 years old to create a YouTube account.

A New Way to Share

With the publishing of the Google Drive app for iOS, we now have a very simple and powerful way for students to turn in video assignments that eliminates the age and privacy concerns mentioned above. The basic workflow with this method is:

  1. Create video in iMovie (or another app)
  2. Export finalized video to the Camera Roll
  3. Use the Google Drive app to upload the video to the student’s drive
  4. Share the video with the teacher

The Details

The first step in this process is to create the video. This can be done in iMovie or any other video tool on the iPad. Once the project is complete, send it to the Cameral Roll. In iMovie this is done by tapping the share icon and then selecting Camera Roll. The exact location of the share button may vary in other apps, but the basic process should be the same. Next select the export size – be careful that you don’t make your video so large that you run out of storage!

Once the video has been added to the Camera Roll, the next step is to open the Google Drive app. I am assuming here that you’ve already installed the app and have entered your account credentials. Once the app is open, tap the “+” button at the top of the screen. You will see several options to add items to your drive, with the third being “Upload Photo or Video.”

When you tap this option, you will be prompted to select a photo or video. Tap on the video that you just created and you will see it begin to upload. This may take a while depending on the size of the file, but it will continue even after the device goes to sleep.
After the upload is completed you will see your video in the list of files. Tap the arrow icon to the right of the file name to open the Details panel, which includes options for sharing. Tap the plus icon in the “Who has access” pane and type the full email address of the person you want to share with. If needed, you can even share with several people. Tap the “Add” button and the process is complete!

Final Thoughts

As you can see, this is a great method for sharing video without running into some of the headaches associated with using YouTube. It keeps your video private and allows you specific control over who can view your file. It also avoids problems due to file size limits in email and age limits on YouTube accounts.

So what do you think? Any suggestions to improve the process? Is there a problem we’re missing here? Let us know in the comments section!

Remind101

Remind101 is a great service that allows teachers, coaches, or anyone who works with students to have a means for sending text messages without the dangers that come with having your students’ or parents’ phone numbers (or them having yours)! As an added bonus, the service now works as an app in Schoology! To find out more, visit the Remind101 website or watch this video:

Uploading to the Schoology dropbox from an iPad

One of the most frustrating things about moving to iPads this year has been the limitations on how to get files from a student to a teacher. There just aren’t many good ways to do it! We’ve spent most of our time discussing how to send work via email, as that has seemed like the only really good option.

Wouldn’t it be great if you could upload to the assignment dropbox in Schoology?

Well, it looks like the folks at Schoology heard our pleas. The most recent update to the app included with it the ability to upload PDF, Word, Excel, and Powerpoint files to the dropbox for an assignment. This is done via the “Open In” menu option in iOS. Read on to see how this would work for submitting something created in Notability…

1. After completing the assignment, the student taps the “Share” button in Notability.

2. Select the destination for your file

3. Select “Open In” from the list of options

4. Tap the “Open Note In…” button

5. Select Schoology from the list. (You may have to scroll down to see Schoology)

6. The iPad will open Schoology and ask you to select a course.

7. Next, select the assignment you want to add the file to

8. Sit back and watch the magic happen…

One important note about this feature… currently it seems that there are some issues with performing this task while on our campus. The helpdesk has been notified about it and are working on fixing the problem. Once that has been corrected, this will give us a great way to have students turn in work inside Schoology!

Best Practices in Fair Use for Medial Literacy Education

The Media Education Lab at Temple University published in 2008 their “Code for Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education.” Their site has videos, lesson plans, and other resources to help educators deal with the often murky waters of copyright and fair use in the classroom. Visit their site for more information, or click here to download a PDF version of the Code.